DQ (Digital Intelligence) Map

Global Standards on Digital Literacy and Skills in the OECD E2030 Learning Framework

A Comprehensive, Adaptable, and Continuously Improving Digital Literacy and Skills Map for All Countries and Sectors

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DQ Framework

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Transformational Competency

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Individual & Societal
Well-Being

DQ Competencies

Click on any of the numbered buttons below
Digital
Citizenship
Digital
Creativity
Digital Entrepreneurship
Digital
Identity
Digital
Use
Digital
Safety
Digital
Security
Digital
Emotional
Intelligence
Digital
Communication
Digital
Literacy
Digital
Rights
1
Digital Citizen Identity
2
Balanced Use of Technology
3
Behavioural Cyber-Risk Management
4
Personal Cyber Security Management
5
Digital Empathy
6
Digital Footprint Management
7
Media and Information Literacies
8
Privacy Management
9
Digital Co-Creator Identity
10
Healthy Use of Technology
11
Content Cyber-Risk Management
12
Network Security Management
13
Self-Awareness and Management
14
Online Communication and Collaboration
15
Content Creation and Computational Literacies
16
Intellectual Property Rights Management
17
Digital Changemaker Identity
18
Civic Use of Technology
19
Commercial and Community Cyber-Risk Management
20
Organisational Cyber Security Management
21
Relationship Management
22
Public and Mass Communication
23
Data and AI Literacies
24
Participatory Rights Management

Digital Citizen Identity

The ability to build and manage a healthy identity as a good digital citizen.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the basic vocabulary needed for discussing the media landscape they are embedded in and the social and multicultural nature of digital media and technologies. They understand the construction of their self-image and persona in the digital environment, as well as the impact that technology may have on their self-image and values (e.g., body images, gender stereotypes that may be idealised in video games and advertising).

Skills

Individuals are able to demonstrate ethical and considerate behaviour and netiquette when using technology across different audiences. They are able to control and shape their own digital identity by creating and curating their online identities in order to tell their own stories while engaging with other individuals from different cultures and possessing global awareness in a way that demonstrates non-discriminatory and culturally sensitive behaviour.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit coherency and integrity across online and offline behaviours, exhibit honesty when using technology, and demonstrate self-efficacy through finding ways to take advantage of the opportunities afforded to them online.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Balanced Use of Technology

The ability to manage one’s online and offline life in a balanced way by self-controlling one’s screen time, multitasking, and online participation.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the impact of technology (e.g., excessive screen time, multi-tasking) on their health, well-being and lifestyles, as well as the strategies for dealing with them.

Skills

Individuals are able to assess health risks and reduce technology-related issues in order to manage their technology usage with self-regulation. In doing so, they are able to develop time and resource management skills that allow them to successfully perform their tasks and to use entertainment when using technology.

Attitudes / Values

By using technology with purpose-driven intentions, individuals exhibit integrity to keep their promises on screen time and technology usage, and develop harmony with others by prioritising building positive relationship with others through self-regulated use of technology.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Behavioural Cyber-Risk Management

The ability to understand, mitigate, and manage personal behavioural cyber-risks online that relate to personal behaviours (e.g., cyberbullying, harassment, stalking).

Knowledge

Individuals understand the different types of behavioural cyber-risks they face online (e.g., cyberbullying, harassment), how they might encounter these risks, how these risks might affect them, and the strategies involved in dealing with them.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop technical, socio-cognitive, communicative, and decision-making skills to deal with behavioural cyber-risk incidents (e.g., cyberbullying) as they occur, whether as a bystander or victim, and transform challenging online experiences into positive lessons.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit kindness when online and when managing their online behaviours as part of contributing to positive and supportive online communities.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Personal Cyber Security Management

The ability to detect cyber threats (e.g., hacking, scams, malware) and to use suitable security strategies and tools for data and device protection.

Knowledge

Individuals understand their personal online risk profiles and how to identify different types of cyber-threats (e.g., hacking, scams, and malware), and also identify available strategies and tools they can use to avoid such threats.

Skills

Individuals are able to identify cyber-threats, use relevant cyber-security practices (e.g., secure and unique passwords, firewalls and anti-virus applications), and use technology without compromising their data and devices.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit resilience and vigilance when online against careless or negligent behaviours that may compromise their own or others' personal information.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Empathy

The ability to understand, be aware of, and be sensitive to one’s own and others' feelings online, and to help others in need.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how their online interactions might affect others' feelings, and recognise how others may be influenced by their online interactions (e.g., effects of online trolls).

Skills

Individuals develop socio-emotional skills through being sensitive to and respecting others’ emotions through synchronous and asynchronous interactions online, and are able to regulate and respond accordingly.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals demonstrate an awareness and compassion for the feelings, needs, and concerns of others online.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Footprint Management

The ability to understand the nature of digital footprints and their real-life consequences (e.g., digital reputation), and to manage them responsibly.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the concept of digital footprints, the consequences that such trails of information and corresponding meta-data may have on their reputations, and the possible uses of such information when shared online.

Skills

Individuals are able to manage their digital footprints and use technology in a manner that contributes to a positive reputation.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit prudence and responsibility online and actively manage the types of information that may be shared throughout their lifetime.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Media and Information Literacies

The ability to find, organise, analyse, and evaluate information and media in an ethical way.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the basic structure of the web, how the use of digital media influences knowledge and information acquisition and management, the distinct and varied reasons for the construction of specific media messages, and the reasons behind campaigns of disinformation and misinformation online.

Skills

Individuals have proficient computer operation skills and are able to use productivity software that enable them to gather and organise digital content. Moreover, they are able to articulate their information and content needs, effectively navigate, critically evaluate and synthesise the information and content they encounter online.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals are careful and critical of the information that they encounter when online, exhibiting discernment in their evaluation of the reliability and credibility of online information.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Privacy Management

The ability to understand personal privacy and the nature of networked information in order to protect one’s and other’s privacy.

Knowledge

Individuals understand privacy as a human right, what is personal information, and how personal information can be used, stored, processed, and shared in digital platforms, along with strategies and tools that enable them to keep their personal information private and secure.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop behavioural and technical strategies to limit privacy violations, and are able to make good decisions around creating and sharing their own information and content.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals show respect for their own and other’s privacy and personal information, treating these as valuable and personal assets worth protecting.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Co-Creator Identity

The ability to identify and develop oneself as a co-creator of the digital ecosystem.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how to integrate digital technologies into their everyday lives in a way that is complementary and productive to their own lives. In turn, they also know when to experiment with new technologies, and reject them when appropriate.

Skills

Individuals are able to use digital technologies to model and explore present-day issues in a way that allows them to build on existing ideas. In turn, they are able to develop and build higher-order thinking and reasoning skills that further aid their capacity to explore their digital and real-life identities and connect with others.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals express self-motivation and resourcefulness when using technologies – whether by taking the initiative or by managing one’s time and efforts to solve problems.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Healthy Use of Technology

The ability to manage the benefits and harms of technology, and promote one’s use of technology in a way that prioritises their health and well-being.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the contexts that shape discourses about the impact of technology on their well-being, and are able to discern how to effectively use technology for their own benefit.

Skills

Individuals are able to use proper ergonomics for technology in a healthy way. This physiological awareness enables them to also identify safe and comfortable practices and equipment for mentally and physically beneficial work processes.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals value mental and physical health and actively self-regulate their use of technology in a healthy way.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Content Cyber-Risk Management

The ability to understand, mitigate, and manage content cyber-risks online (e.g., harmful user-generated content, racist/hateful content).

Knowledge

Individuals understand content cyber-risks that they face online (e.g., harmful user-generated content such as racist, hateful, or discriminatory content/images), and the strategies involved with dealing with them.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop and use conflict management techniques and strategies to handle such risks and mitigate them, whether through avoiding or confronting individuals or groups involved in the creation of such content, reporting of an incident to platform administrators or through other appropriate processes.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit resilience and fortify themselves against content that may be hurtful or derogatory. In turn, they also proactively work towards contributing to a healthy, open, and supportive online community.

Network Security Management

The ability to detect, avoid, and manage cyber-threats to cloud-based collaborative digital environments.

Knowledge

Individuals understand cyber-threats specific to cloud networks and collaborative digital environments (e.g., email servers) that may compromise their data and devices, and the options available to them for securing their relevant data and/or devices.

Skills

Individuals are able to identify weaknesses in their network that leave them vulnerable to possible cyber-threats and develop relevant protocols to ensure and/or improve the security of their collaborative work.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals continuously take the initiative to remain updated about evolving cyber-threats, their risk profiles, and their network vulnerabilities when using technology.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Self-Awareness and Management

The ability to recognise and manage how one’s value system fits with one’s environment, and its impact on others through technology.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how their own value systems influence and are influenced by their digital environments, and are able to explain how their moods may affect others.

Skills

Individuals are able to identify and explain their emotions, reflect on how their feelings may be influenced by their digital experiences, and manage their moods and impulses accordingly with active self-regulation.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit self-awareness of their own moods and emotions, and actively self-regulate to manage their impulses accordingly. In doing so, they exhibit respect for others during their online communication.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Online Communication and Collaboration

The ability to use technology effectively to communicate and work collectively, including at a distance.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the different types of peer-to-peer collaboration and communication strategies, tools, and formats, and are able to decide which methods are most effective and efficient for their collaborative goals. In addition, they also understand types of social and market pressures that may encourage or discourage communication and/or collaboration across groups.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop socio-emotional, interpersonal, and cognitive skills that support their efforts around collaboration. These skills include the capacity to interact and collaborate with an online community of peers and experts for the construction and co-creation of knowledge.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit a positive attitude towards using technology that enables and supports collaboration and productivity. They also actively help others build up a positive digital reputation (i.e., skill endorsements, reviews).

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Content Creation and Computational Literacies

The ability to synthesise, create, and produce information, media, and technology in an innovative and creative manner.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the theory of computational thinking and possess the algorithmic literacy necessary for the foundations of programming, machine learning, and digital modelling.

Skills

Individuals are able to build on, organise, and share knowledge and digital content and technology. Skills include being able to access needs, to identify and use data tools and technology to solve problems, and to adjust and customise digital environments to suit personal and community needs. Moreover, they are able to exhibit computational thinking – abstraction, automation, and analysis – and develop technical skills to share and/or create forms of hard or software for their communities.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit an active and constant willingness to engage with evolving and advancing digital technology, and are motivated to adopt such advancements and learn requisite skills for lifelong learning and their own development.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Intellectual Property Rights Management

The ability to understand and manage intellectual property rights, including copyright, trademarks, and patents, when using and creating technology.

Knowledge

Individuals understand legislation and rights around ownership and remixing of online content (e.g., digital rights management technologies, plagiarism, copyright, fair use, licensing), and are able to distinguish between creative use and appropriation of others’ work.

Skills

Individuals are able to utilise strategies (such as trademarks, creative commons, and copyrights) for protecting their own and others’ personal content – as well as content created from collaboration – through a variety of tools and legislation, and are able to distinguish between types of content that can be legally downloaded and those that ought to be paid for.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit responsibility and self-respect by protecting their own digital creations, and crediting others’ creation when appropriate.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Changemaker Identity

The ability to recognise and develop oneself as an entrepreneurial changemaker to solve problems using technology.

Knowledge

Individuals understand general and emerging trends within media environments, and how the use of technology shapes and is shaped by globalisation and interdependent networks. In turn, they understand the need to synthesise and recognise emerging problems that may be addressed by technology.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop complex problem-solving skills by extending their thinking beyond the individual scale to integrate digital networks and tools in their approach to broader social and economic issues. They are also able to manage projects and develop productivity skills to complete projects that address such issues.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit professionalism and self-worth in their work, curiosity and awareness of existing gaps in their digital competencies and evolving technology, and are comfortable in exploring and exploiting technology for self-development and personal growth.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Civic Use of Technology

The ability to engage in the well-being of local, national, and global communities using technology.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the importance of community engagement and civic participation as essential for maintaining the well-being of their local, national, and global communities.

Skills

Individuals are able to organise and rally a group online or know how to participate in an organised online group, for social change. In doing so, they are able to engage with individuals through different mediums, understand online community behaviours, participate in synchronous and asynchronous discussions, create shared values and positively influence their communities through appropriate digital technologies.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit a belief in and respect for civic engagement; and are willing and open to involve themselves in their communities to contribute towards the bettering of society.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Commercial and Community Cyber-Risk Management

The ability to understand, mitigate, and manage commercial or community cyber-risks online, which is an organisational attempt to exploit individuals financially and/or through ideological persuasion (e.g., embedded marketing, online propaganda, and gambling).

Knowledge

Individuals understand different types of commercial or community cyber-risks (e.g., embedded marketing, online propaganda, and gambling), their contextual exposure to such risks as individuals belonging to specific communities and groups, and the strategies involved in dealing with them.

Skills

Individuals are able to demonstrate depth and currency of knowledge about legal and ethical issues related to commercial and community cyber-risks. They are able to identify and/or develop strategies and use tools such as ad-blockers and web extensions to mitigate and manage their exposure to such risks in order to enhance their quality of life.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit caution and vigilance when online; understand where and when strategies for dealing with risks such as ideological persuasion or programmatic advertising may be available to them, and devise creative ways to handle and avoid the dangers of these risks.

Organisational Cyber Security Management

The ability to recognise, plan, and implement organisational cyber security defences.

Knowledge

Individuals understand comprehensive anti-virus/mal-ware software related to organisational data/devices/systems, and are able to develop and implement their own digital resiliency plans.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop basic cognitive and technical skills for the development and implementation of their organisation’s cyber security, including understanding of organisation-wide asset and risk management, data protection protocols, and the ability to conduct analysis of cyber-security events in order to carry out recovery planning and improvements.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals prioritise the security of their digital assets by taking the initiative to safeguard them via training, ongoing education, and open dialogue.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Relationship Management

The ability to skilfully manage one’s online relationships through collaboration, conflict management, and persuasion.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the different contexts of social interaction in online communities, and how different behavioural norms and corresponding emotions evoked may vary depending on the platform and context.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop interpersonal skills that enable them to engage with others in an intercultural online dialogue, so as to effectively collaborate by building rapport and nurturing positive relationships online.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit self-motivation and a commitment to building rapport and growing positive communities online. In doing so, they demonstrate tact and diplomacy and a willingness to listen to a diverse set of opinions before making sound decisions.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Public and Mass Communication

The ability to communicate with an online audience effectively in order to exchange messages, ideas, and opinions that reflect a wider societal discourse.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how different online platforms, digital environments, cultures, and policies may aid or restrict the dissemination of and engagement with ideas and messages. In turn, they understand the ethical and legal underpinnings that shape the construction and spread of ideas and messages online.

Skills

Individuals are able to demonstrate the ability to communicate their ideas and messages with the digital technologies available to them (e.g., setting up a crowdfunding initiative, participating in a social movement online, or launching a digital marketing campaign). Skills include being able to engage their audience in a dialogue, utilise search engine optimisation and/or search engine marketing strategies, and monitor data analytics to strategically boost engagement with their overarching messages online.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit an attitude towards using technology collaboratively that is both purposeful and principled in order to engage in a productive discourse with others in their digital communities.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Data and AI Literacies

The ability to derive meaningful information from data and use artificial intelligence (AI) so as to make informed, effective, and contextually relevant decisions.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the basic theory of data analysis, and the benefits and potential risks brought about through big data, AI and related technologies. This knowledge informs their understanding of AI, how it might be used to enhance efficiency in creative processes, and how they might utilise it in their own lives to work effectively.

Skills

Individuals are able to read, manage, and evaluate data; and create and build knowledge from data that is meaningful for themselves. In turn, they are able to communicate this meaning to others. Skills for data and AI literacy include the technical ability to understand how specific data is generated, to process data based on statistical understanding, and to create and/or use algorithms (e.g. machine learning, neural networks, deep learning) to recognise significant patterns and to improve decision-making processes. One's cognitive and meta-cognitive awareness are developed through learning how to present data visually, and understanding how data and AI may affect one's perception and reasoning. Individuals are also able to leverage AI to augment their own intelligence while remaining aware of how human value judgements play into the applications of big data and AI in society.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals are confident in pursuing innovative and creative careers. They are also proactive in applying their knowledge of data and AI into evaluating whether broader systems are acting in ways aligned with community values.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Participatory Rights Management

The ability to understand and exercise one’s powers and right to online participation (e.g., freedom of speech and censorship issues).

Knowledge

Individuals understand their rights as digital citizens and consumers (e.g.,right to personal data protection, right to freedom of expression, right to be forgotten), and understand that and why online participation differs across groups (e.g., due to socioeconomic status, disability, physical location) such that opportunities for participation – as citizens or consumers – are often unevenly distributed.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop cognitive and meta-cognitive skills that enable them to synthesise existing legislation with their own practices to ensure that their digital rights are upheld and respected online. They also develop complex system-level thinking in upholding individual and community rights to online participation as they monitor and improve systems while holding contradictory ideas and ideals in tension.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit proactive thinking, grounded in respect for the rule of law and human rights, when they uphold their rights to online participation, and take responsibility to manage technology to promote the public good and society, the environment, and democratic ideals.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

How the DQ Framework is connected to the OECD's Transformative Competencies

The OECD has identified three categories of competencies that empower individuals to transform their societies and shape their futures. These three "Transformative Competencies" are (1) creating new value, (2) reconciling tensions and dilemmas, and (3) taking responsibility.

These intra-connected competencies connect with other future-readiness competencies, which have been identified by other organizations. These include the "trending skills" that the WEF has predicted to be key for the workforce by 2022. This section provides examples of how each of the 24 competencies identified in this report can help develop such "trending skills" and, in turn, how they enhance the OECD's Transformative Competencies.

OECD's Transformative Competencies

Creating New Values

  • Global or local learners who can creates a shared values and outcomes that can benefit the community while connecting and learning online with others (Mozilla)
  • Actively and constantly explores emerging technologies, integrates them in his/her environment and uses them for lifelong learning and their own development (British Columbia)
  • Confident in pursuing the innovative and creative careers of the future (Massachusetts Digital Literacy and Computer Science Curriculum Framework)
  • Demonstrating an informed, open-minded, and balanced attitude towards information society and the use of digital technology, is curious, aware of opportunities and new developments, and is comfortable to explore and exploit them. (British Columbia)
  • Able to successfully perform work tasks by applying information technology appropriately and effectively. (US Dep Ed Employability Skills)
  • A digitally literate person uses technology to improve his/her ability to gather, organise, analyse, and judge the relevant and purpose of digital information.[BC]
  • Informed decision making: A digitally literate person is aware of most relevant or common technologies and is able to decide upon the most appropriate technology according to the purpose or need at hand.[BC]

Taking Responsibility

  • Global or local learners who can creates a shared values and outcomes that can benefit the community while connecting and learning online with others (Mozilla)
  • Actively and constantly explores emerging technologies, integrates them in his/her environment and uses them for lifelong learning and their own development (British Columbia)
  • Confident in pursuing the innovative and creative careers of the future (Massachusetts Digital Literacy and Computer Science Curriculum Framework)
  • Demonstrating an informed, open-minded, and balanced attitude towards information society and the use of digital technology, is curious, aware of opportunities and new developments, and is comfortable to explore and exploit them. (British Columbia)
  • Able to successfully perform work tasks by applying information technology appropriately and effectively. (US Dep Ed Employability Skills)
  • A digitally literate person uses technology to improve his/her ability to gather, organise, analyse, and judge the relevant and purpose of digital information.[BC]
  • Informed decision making: A digitally literate person is aware of most relevant or common technologies and is able to decide upon the most appropriate technology according to the purpose or need at hand.[BC]

Reconciling Tensions & Dilemmas

  • Global or local learners who can creates a shared values and outcomes that can benefit the community while connecting and learning online with others (Mozilla)
  • Actively and constantly explores emerging technologies, integrates them in his/her environment and uses them for lifelong learning and their own development (British Columbia)
  • Confident in pursuing the innovative and creative careers of the future (Massachusetts Digital Literacy and Computer Science Curriculum Framework)
  • Demonstrating an informed, open-minded, and balanced attitude towards information society and the use of digital technology, is curious, aware of opportunities and new developments, and is comfortable to explore and exploit them. (British Columbia)
  • Able to successfully perform work tasks by applying information technology appropriately and effectively. (US Dep Ed Employability Skills)
  • A digitally literate person uses technology to improve his/her ability to gather, organise, analyse, and judge the relevant and purpose of digital information.[BC]
  • Informed decision making: A digitally literate person is aware of most relevant or common technologies and is able to decide upon the most appropriate technology according to the purpose or need at hand.[BC]

How DQ Framework Contributes to OECD's 11 Areas of Well-Being and U.N. SDG

The ultimate goal of the DQ Framework is to guide digital practices toward achieving individual and societal well-being across all aspects of one's life.

The OECD's Better Life Initiative identified the following 11 areas of well-being: jobs, income, housing, work-life balance, safety, life satisfaction, health, civic engagement, environment, education, and community. These 11 areas of well-being, in turn, contribute to achieving the 17 U.N. Sustainable Development Goals (U.N. SDGs).

1No Poverty

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

2Zero Hunger

End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

3Good Health
& Well-Being

Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

4Quality Education

Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

5Gender Equality

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

6Clean water
& Sanitation

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

7Affordable &
Clean Energy

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

8Decent Work &
Economic Growth

Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

9Industry,
Innovation &
Infastructure

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

10Reduced
Inequalities

Reduce inequality within and among countries

11Sustainable
Cities &
Communities

Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

12Responbible
Consumption &
Production

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

13Climate Action

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*

14Life Below Water

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

15Life on Land

Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

16Peace, Justice
& Strong
Institutions

Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

17Partnership
for the Goals

Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

The U.N. SDGs are dedicated to 17 societal dimensions, including ending poverty and promoting prosperity, well-being, and protection of the planet.

With the goal of advancing the U.N. SDGs, we adopted the OECD's 11 indicators of well-being as a guide for pinpointing areas where interventions can be made to equip individuals with digital intelligence.

OECD Well-Being Indicators U.N. Sustainable Development Goal Digital Intelligence to achieve individual and societal well-beings:
Income Goal 1: No Poverty. Ending poverty around the world through the use and application of technology with digital intelligence.
Goal 2: Zero Hunger. Ending hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture through the use of technology with digital intelligence.
Health Goal 3: Health and Well-Being. Ensuring healthful living and promote well-being in one's use of technology with digital intelligence.
Education Goal 4: Quality Education. Ensuring inclusive and equitable quality digital intelligence education and promote life-long learning opportunities that adapt to an ever-evolving digital landscape.
Work-life balance Goal 5: Gender Equality. Achieving gender equality by utilizing technology and empowering all women and girls to confidently and competently use technology and digital intelligence.
Housing Goal 6: Clean Water and Sanitation. Promoting technological innovations through digital intelligence to address and ensure the availability of sustainable water and sanitation management for all.
Environment Goal 7: Affordable and Clean Energy. Using technology with digital intelligence to ensure access to affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy for all.
Jobs Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth. Contributing to sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work by upskilling for all.
Goal 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure. Building resilient digital infrastructure, promoting inclusive and sustainable industrialization and innovation by fostering ethical cyber security and safety skills among citizens through digital intelligence.
Life Satisfaction Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities. Reducing inequality within and among countries by supporting initiatives that address digital divides in access, skills, and infrastructure, and by providing affirmative action for those already vulnerable communities.
Community Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities. Applying digital intelligence to make cities and human settlements safer, more inclusive, more resilient, and more sustainable through the use of clean and sustainable technology.
Civic Engagement Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production. Ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns by using technology with digital intelligence to bring about equitable, just, and sustainable global supply chains.
Environment Goal 13: Climate Action. Guiding one's use of technology with digital intelligence to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
Goal 14: Life Below Water. Using technology with digital intelligence to conserve and sustainably use oceans, seas, and marine resources for sustainable development.
Goal 15: Life on Land. Using technology with digital intelligence to protect, restore, and promote the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and biodiversity loss.
Safety Goal 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions. Promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, providing access to justice for all, and building effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions at all levels by empowering communities with digital intelligence to reduce and mitigate evolving cyber risks and threats.
Community Goal 17: Partnership for the Goals. Strengthening technology by implementing digital intelligence and revitalizing global partnerships for sustainable development.