What is the DQ Framework?

Global Standards for Digital Literacy, Skills, and Readiness
(IEEE 3527.1™ Standard for Digital Intelligence (DQ))

 

Beyond IQ and EQ, DQ (Digital Intelligence) represents critical skills needed to thrive in the digital age.

DQ is defined as “a comprehensive set of technical, cognitive, meta-cognitive, and socio-emotional competencies that are grounded in universal moral values and that enable individuals to face the challenges and harness the opportunities of digital life.

Its framework aggregated across more than 25 prior leading frameworks about digital literacy and skills. It lays out a common language, structure, and taxonomy around digital literacy, skills, and readiness that can be benchmarked, referenced, and adopted across nations and sectors worldwide. The DQ Framework was internationally acclaimed and endorsed by the Coalition for Digital Intelligence (CDI), formed in 2018 by the OECD, IEEE SA, and DQ Institute in association with the World Economic Forum, with the commitment to promote digital literacy and digital skills around the world.

DQ 24

DQ comprises 24 digital competencies. It focuses on 8 critical areas of digital life– identity, use, safety, security, emotional intelligence, literacy, communication, and rights. These 8 areas can each be developed at three levels: citizenship, creativity, and competitiveness.

  • Citizenship focuses on basic levels of skills needed to use technologies in responsible, safe, and ethical ways.
  • Creativity allows problem-solving through the creation of new knowledge, technologies, and content.
  • Competitiveness focuses on innovations to change communities and the economy for broad benefit.

DQ Competencies

Click on any of the numbered buttons below
Digital
Citizenship
Digital
Creativity
Digital Competitiveness
Digital
Identity
Digital
Use
Digital
Safety
Digital
Security
Digital
Emotional
Intelligence
Digital
Communication
Digital
Literacy
Digital
Rights
1
Digital Citizen Identity
2
Balanced Use of Technology
3
Behavioural Cyber-Risk Management
4
Personal Cyber Security Management
5
Digital Empathy
6
Digital Footprint Management
7
Media and Information Literacy
8
Privacy Management
9
Digital Co-Creator Identity
10
Healthy Use of Technology
11
Content Cyber-Risk Management
12
Network Security Management
13
Self-Awareness and Management
14
Online Communication and Collaboration
15
Content Creation and Computational Literacy
16
Intellectual Property Rights Management
17
Digital Changemaker Identity
18
Civic Use of Technology
19
Commercial and Community Cyber-Risk Management
20
Organisational Cyber Security Management
21
Relationship Management
22
Public and Mass Communication
23
Data and AI Literacy
24
Participatory Rights Management

Digital Citizen Identity

The ability to build and manage a healthy identity as a digital citizen with integrity.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the basic vocabulary needed for discussing the media landscapes in which they are embedded; the social and multicultural nature of digital media and technologies; the construction of their self-image and persona in the digital environment; and the impact that technology may have on their self-image and values (e.g., body images, gender stereotypes that may be idealized in digital media such as video game or advertising, and racial stereotypes that may be embedded in the system), and how personal use of digital media may have professional implications.

Skills

Individuals are able to demonstrate ethical and considerate behavior and netiquette when using technology across different audiences, to control and shape their own digital identity by creating and curating their online identities to tell their stories while engaging with others from different cultures and possessing global awareness in a way that demonstrates non-discriminatory and culturally sensitive behavior.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit coherency and integrity across online and offline behaviors, honesty when using technology, and demonstrate self-efficacy by finding ways to take advantage of the opportunities afforded to them online.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Balanced Use of Technology

The ability to manage one’s life both online and offline in a balanced way by exercising self-control to manage screen time, multitasking, and one’s engagement with digital media and devices.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the nature and impact of technology use (e.g., excessive screen time, multi-tasking) on their health, work productivity, well-being, and lifestyles, and have appropriate knowledge to deal with these impacts.

Skills

Individuals are able to assess health risks and reduce technology-related issues to better self-regulate their technology usage; in doing so, they become able to develop the time and resource management skills to more successfully perform tasks and more safely enjoy entertainment.

Attitudes / Values

By using technology with purpose-driven intentions, individuals exhibit integrity by adhering to goals in terms of screen time and technology usage, and develop positive relationships with others through the self-regulated use of technology.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Behavioural Cyber-Risk Management

The ability to identify, mitigate, and manage cyber risks (e.g., cyberbullying, harassment, and stalking) that relate to personal online behaviors.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the different types of behavioral cyber risks (e.g., cyberbullying, harassment, and stalking), how they might encounter these risks, how these risks might affect them, and how they can formulate strategies for dealing with them.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop the appropriate technical, socio-cognitive, communicative, and decision-making skills to address behavioral cyber risk incidents as they occur, whether as a bystander or victim, and gain valuable coping tools to address these negative online experiences.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit kindness when online, know the supportive framework in place to address risks, and are able to manage their online behavior as part of contributing to positive and supportive online communities.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Personal Cyber Security Management

The ability to detect cyber threats (e.g., hacking, scams, and malware) against personal data and device, and to use suitable security strategies and protection tools.

Knowledge

Individuals understand their personal online risk profiles and how to identify different types of cyber-threats (e.g., hacking, scams, and malware), and also identify available strategies and tools they can use to avoid such threats.

Skills

Individuals are able to identify cyber threats, use relevant cyber security practices (e.g., secure passwords, firewalls, and anti-malware applications), and use technology without compromising their data and devices.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit resilience and vigilance against careless or negligent behaviors that may compromise their own or others’ data and device security, and have confidence about what to do when there is a problem.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Empathy

The ability to be aware of, be sensitive to, and be supportive of one’s own and other’s feelings, needs and concerns online.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how their online interactions might affect others' feelings, and recognise how others may be influenced by their online interactions (e.g., effects of online trolls).

Skills

Individuals develop socio-emotional skills by becoming sensitive to and respecting others’ perspectives and emotions through synchronous and asynchronous interactions online and are able to regulate and respond accordingly.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals demonstrate an awareness and compassion for the feelings, needs, and concerns of others online.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Footprint Management

The ability to understand the nature of digital footprints and their real-life consequences, to manage them responsibly, and to actively build a positive digital reputation.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the concept of digital footprints, the consequences that such trails of information and corresponding meta-data may have on their reputation and others, and the possible uses of such information when shared online.

Skills

Individuals are able to manage their digital footprints and use technology in a manner that contributes to a positive reputation both for themselves and the organization they belong to.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit mindful care, prudence and responsibility online, with the goal of actively managing the types of information that may be shared, tagged, released, gathered, and collected by themselves and others across multiple platforms throughout time.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Media and Information Literacy

The ability to find, organize, analyze, and evaluate media and information with critical reasoning.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the basic structure of the digital media, how the use of digital media influences knowledge and information acquisition and management, the distinct and varied reasons for the construction of specific media messages, and the reasons behind campaigns of disinformation and misinformation online.

Skills

Individuals have proficient computer operation skills and are able to use productivity software or applications that enable them to gather and organise digital content. Moreover, individuals are they are able to articulate their information and content needs, effectively navigate, critically evaluate and synthesise the information and content they encounter online.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals are careful and critical of the information that they encounter when online, exhibiting discernment in their evaluation of the reliability and credibility of online information.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Privacy Management

The ability to handle with discretion all personal information shared online to protect one’s and others’ privacy.

Knowledge

Individuals understand privacy as a human right, what personal information is, and how it can be used, stored, processed, and shared in digital platforms, along with strategies and tools that help them keep their personal information private and secure.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop behavioral and technical strategies to limit privacy violations, and are able to make good decisions around creating and sharing information and content of their own as well as that of others’.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals show respect for their own and other’s privacy and personal information, treating these as valuable and personal assets worth protecting.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Co-Creator Identity

The ability to identify and develop oneself as a co-creator of the digital ecosystem.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how to keep up with advancements in information and communication technology as well as integrate digital technologies into their everyday lives in a way that is complementary and productive rather than disruptive. In turn, they learn to be open to experimenting with new technology and when to reject them. In doing so, they can seek out co-creation opportunities (e.g., new models of products or services) borne from these technological progressions in the digital ecosystem.

Skills

With a healthy identity as a co-creator of the digital ecosystem, individuals are able to explore and identify present-day problems and issues. They develop and build higher-order thinking and reasoning skills that further aid their capacity and connect with others. In turn, they build on existing ideas and further co-develop new ideas to solve them using technology. As lifelong learners, they continuously learn and generate new ideas to solve problems efficiently

Attitudes / Values

Individuals express self-motivation and resourcefulness when using technology—whether by taking initiative or by knowing when and how to deploy and allocate their time, efforts, and resources.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Healthy Use of Technology

The ability to understand the benefits and harms of technology on one’s mental and physical health and to use technology use while prioritizing health and well-being.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the contexts that shape discourses about the impact of technology on their well-being, and are able to discern how to effectively use technology for their own benefit.

Skills

Individuals are able to use technology ergonomically. Physiological awareness helps users identify safe, comfortable practices and equipment for mentally and physically beneficial work processes.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals value mental and physical health and actively self-regulate their use of technology in a healthy way.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Content Cyber-Risk Management

The ability to identify, mitigate, and manage content cyber risks online (e.g., harmful usergenerated content, racist/hateful content, image-based abuse).

Knowledge

Individuals understand content cyber risks that they face online (e.g., harmful user-generated content such as racist, hateful, discriminatory content/images, or image-based abuse), and the strategies involved in dealing with them.

Skills

Individuals become better equipped to develop and use conflict management techniques to mitigate such risks, whether through avoiding or confronting individuals or groups involved in the creation of such content, reporting incidents to platform administrators, or other appropriate processes.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit resilience and fortify themselves against content that may be hurtful or derogatory while proactively contributing to a healthy, open, and supportive online community.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Network Security Management

The ability to detect, avoid, and manage cyber-threats to cloud-based collaborative digital environments.

Knowledge

Individuals understand cyber threats specific to cloud networks and collaborative digital environments that may compromise their data, devices, and systems, and the options available to them for ensuring appropriate levels of protection, confidentiality, and privacy.

Skills

Individuals are able to predict and identify weaknesses and risks in their networks that leave them vulnerable to possible cyber threats. They evaluate vulnerabilities, quantify associated risks (e.g., business loss), employ tools, strategies, and protocols to ensure and improve the confidentiality and security of their collaborative work. Additionally, they monitor their networks and systems and implement support systems to allow for optimum productivity and performance. If individuals belong to an organization, their security tools and strategies are aligned with their organization’s security framework, guidelines, and technical requirements to ensure minimal impact to their business.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals continuously take the initiative to stay up-to-date about evolving cyber threats, risk profiles, and network vulnerabilities when using technology.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Self-Awareness and Management

The ability to recognize and manage how one’s value system and digital competencies fits with one’s digital environment.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how their own value systems influence and are influenced by their digital environments, and are able to explain how their moods may affect others.

Skills

Individuals are able to identify and explain their emotions, reflect on how their feelings may be influenced by their digital experiences, and manage their moods and impulses accordingly with active self-regulation. In addition, they are able to stay aware of their own level of digital competence and actively work to manage and update their skillset. They manage their emotions as well as competencies to foster cooperation and positive interactions between internal and external stakeholders in order to fulfill their goals.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit an awareness of their own moods and are actively able to manage their impulses accordingly, thereby respecting others during online communication.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Online Communication and Collaboration

The ability to use technology effectively to communicate and collaborate collectively, including at a distance.

Knowledge

Individuals understand different types of peer-to-peer communication and collaboration strategies, tools, and formats, and decide which methods are most effective for individual or collaborative goals. In addition, they understand the various social and market pressures that may encourage or discourage communication and/or collaboration across certain groups.

Skills

Individuals are able to develop socio-emotional, interpersonal, and cognitive skills that support their communication and collaborative efforts. These skills include the capacity to interact and collaborate with an online community of peers and experts for the construction and co-creation of knowledge. They are also able to leverage on their technical skills to efficiently exchange ideas and work together even at a distance through utilizing a variety of different communication channels.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit initiative and positive attitudes towards technology use that enable and support collaboration and productivity. They also exhibit an inclusive attitude that fosters positive collaboration culture and teamwork while achieving organizational goals (e.g., helping others build positive digital reputations through skill endorsements or reviews).

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Content Creation and Computational Literacy

The ability to synthesise, create, and produce information, media, and technology in an innovative and creative manner.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the theory of digital content creation and computational thinking and possess algorithmic literacy such as programming and digital modelling.

Skills

Individuals are able to conceptualize, build on, organize, create, adapt, and share knowledge, digital content, and technology. They access needs, synthesize knowledge and ideas across a variety of disciplines to make decisions and cooperate with others, identify and use data digital media tools and technology to solve problems, and adjust and customize digital environments to suit personal, organizational, and community needs. They are able to share information and knowledge and create and execute plans for the design of digital creations (e.g., content, software or hardware) based on needs as well as practicality, efficiency, and functionality. Moreover, they exhibit computational thinking — selection and application of algorithms, interpretation of data, and usage of advanced computational methods to achieve desired results, tasks and/or address specific issues or requirements. Furthermore, they develop applications in line with a specified design as well as existing development and security standards and are able to analyze components and reuse, improve, reconfigure, add, or integrate as needed. They also ensure a seamless user experience of their digital creation by prioritizing ease of usage, including visual, technical, and functional elements in the interface design as well as configuring their end creations to efficiently deploy releases to different platforms and operating systems.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit an active and constant willingness to engage with evolving and advancing digital technology, becoming motivated to adopt such advances and learn the skills required for lifelong learning and their own development.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Intellectual Property Rights Management

The ability to understand and manage intellectual property rights (e.g., copyrights, trademarks, and patents) when using and creating content and technology.

Knowledge

Individuals understand legislation and rights around ownership and remixing of online content (e.g., digital rights management technologies, plagiarism, copyright, fair use, licensing), and are able to distinguish between creative use and appropriation of others’ work.

Skills

Individuals distinguish between digital creations that can be legally downloaded and that which must be paid for. They utilize strategies (such as trademarks, creative commons, and copyrights) for protecting their own and others’ digital creations—in addition to content created collaboratively—through a variety of tools and legislation. Moreover, they track and manage changes in their digital creations in order to protect their own/organizational assets from unauthorized change, use, and deviation.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals build trust, exhibit responsibility, self respect, and respect for others by protecting their own digital creations and crediting others’ creations when appropriate.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Digital Changemaker Identity

The ability to identify and develop oneself as a competent changemaker in the digital economy.

Knowledge

Individuals understand general and emerging trends within digital environments, how the use of technology shapes and is shaped by globalization and interdependent networks, and the need to recognize emerging problems that technology can create and address. They identify and evaluate innovative business or social impact opportunities provided by new technology advances.

Skills

Individuals develop higher order thinking skills by extending their thinking beyond the individual scale to integrate digital networks and tools in response to broader social and economic issues. They monitor and integrate emerging technology trends and developments, structured data gathering for the identification of new and emerging technological products/services identifying the potential value add to the business, and in doing so, become better equipped to manage and complete projects that address such issues and to develop a business strategy for sustainability and profitability.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit professionalism and self-worth, curiosity, and awareness of existing gaps in their digital competencies with evolving technology and are comfortable in exploring and exploiting technology for self-development and further business growth.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Civic Use of Technology

The ability to engage in civic participation for the well-being and growth of local, national, and global communities using technology.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the importance of community engagement and civic participation that meet the quality expectations and standards that are aligned with the individuals’ and/or organizational values and business objectives and the well-being of their local, national, and global communities

Skills

Individuals are able to organize and rally a group online or know how to participate in an organized online group for effecting change that they aim to create. In doing so, they are better equipped to engage with individuals or groups through various digital media, to develop and review procedures, to participate in synchronous and asynchronous discussions, to create shared values, and to positively influence their communities through appropriate technologies.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit a belief in and respect for civic engagement and are willing to become involved in their communities for the betterment of their own organizations and/or society.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Commercial and Community Cyber-Risk Management

The ability to understand, mitigate, and manage commercial or community cyber-risks online, which is an organisational attempt to exploit individuals financially and/or through ideological persuasion (e.g., embedded marketing, online propaganda, and gambling).

Knowledge

Individuals understand different types of commercial or community cyber risks (e.g., embedded marketing, online propaganda, and gambling), their contextual exposure to such risks as members of specific communities and groups, and demonstrate depth and currency of knowledge about legal and ethical issues related to commercial and community cyber risks.

Skills

Individuals become familiar with the strategies involved in dealing with these risks. They are able to identify and/or develop strategies and tools (e.g., ad blockers and Web extensions) to mitigate and manage exposure to risks and enhance quality of life. They detect and report incidents, identify affected systems and user groups, and trigger alerts and announcements to relevant stakeholders and efficient resolution of the solution. They manage the lifecycle of problems to prevent problems and incidents from occurring, eliminate recurring incidents, and minimize the impact of unavoidable incidents.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit caution and vigilance when online, understand where and when strategies for dealing with risks may be available to them, and devise creative ways to handle and avoid the dangers associated with these risks.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Organisational Cyber Security Management

The ability to recognise, plan, and implement organisational cyber security defences.

Knowledge

Individuals understand support architectures, policies, practices, and procedures that enable the organizations to manage threats, including anti-malware software related to organizational data/devices/systems. They have knowledge about proper handling, usage, and storage of an organization’s IT assets to limit potential business or legal risks and are able to develop and implement their own digital resiliency plans.

Skills

Individuals develop cognitive and technical skills for improving their organization’s cyber security systems, which impact the operation and profitability of the business. They forecast and assess existing and potential security risks, and develop and implement intervention strategies to proactively protect and optimize an organization’s IT assets in alignment with internal policies and processes on relevant legislation and business strategies. They further enable the prompt recovery of critical IT infrastructure and systems following a crisis or disaster. They develop and disseminate corporate security policies, frameworks, and guidelines to ensure that day-to-day business operations guard or are well protected against risks, threats, and vulnerabilities.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals value cyber security and proactively advocate it in their organization by providing advice and guidance on potential risks, mitigation strategies, and best practices. This includes development of communication strategies for organizations and communities to ensure adoption and adherence to security policies and standards that enable viable secure conditions for work and living.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Relationship Management

The ability to skilfully manage one’s online relationships through collaboration, conflict management, and persuasion.

Knowledge

Individuals understand and manage different contexts of social interaction in online communities to achieve mutual consensus and outcomes. They understand how different behavioral norms and emotional reactions may vary depending on the platform and context.

Skills

Individuals develop interpersonal skills that enable them to engage effectively and communicate and negotiate with and influence stakeholders in an intercultural online dialogue. They manage, maintain, and grow relationships with a specific group based on individual or organizational needs (e.g., in-depth customer engagement, relationship-building and provision of quality solutions and service to address customer needs). They build cooperative partnerships with inter-organizational and external stakeholders and leverage relations to meet organizational objectives. They can also manage various expectations and needs by building rapport, planning of actions to effectively communicate with, and negotiating with and influencing stakeholders.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit self-motivation and a commitment to provide an inclusive culture that cultivates tolerance to one another and teamwork towards building and growing positive communities online. They are committed to exceeding both internal and external stakeholders’ needs by demonstrating diplomacy, and a willingness to identify others’ needs first and to consider a diverse set of opinions before making sound decisions.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Public and Mass Communication

The ability to communicate with an online audience effectively to exchange messages, ideas, and opinions reflecting wider business or societal discourses.

Knowledge

Individuals understand how different online platforms, digital environments, cultures, and policies may aid or restrict the dissemination of ideas and messages and how ethical and legal underpinnings shape the spread of ideas and messages online.

Skills

Individuals communicate their ideas and messages through digital media and technology that are available to them (e.g., setting up a crowdfunding initiative, participating in a social movement online, or launching a digital marketing campaign). They conceptualize digital storyboards, optimize content delivery and their messages, develop dissemination strategies on and across various channels and platforms, and track audience response and communication effectiveness. They engage audiences in a dialogue utilizing various digital tools including search engine optimization and/or marketing strategies, and monitoring data analytics to strategically boost engagement online. They co-create an organization’s projected brand and reputation by developing and implementing branding campaigns, public relations, and reputation management strategies. They plan and conduct research to understand overall trends (e.g., market, customer, and competitor) to extract useful insights and optimization efforts.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit an attitude towards collaborative technology use that is ethical, purposeful, and principled to engage in a productive discourse with their digital communities.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Data and AI Literacy

The ability to generate, process, analyze, present meaningful information from data and develop, use, and apply artificial intelligence (AI) and related algorithmic tools and strategies in order to guide informed, optimized, and contextually relevant decision-making processes.

Knowledge

Individuals understand the theory of data analysis, statistics, and AI-related mathematical concepts and computer programming. They understand how data are generated, to process data based on statistical understanding, and to create and/or use AI algorithms (e.g., machine learning, neural networks, deep learning) to recognise significant patterns and to improve decision-making processes. They understand concepts across multiple disciplines and identify the benefits, limits, and risks brought about through big data, AI, and related technology.

Skills

Individuals develop efficient and stable processes to collect, store, extract, transform, load, and integrate data at various stages in the data pipeline. They read, manage, analyze, and process data from a variety of sources, and prepare data in a structure that is easily accessed and analyzed according to specific requirements. They create and build knowledge by analyzing data, communicate its meaning to others with various data visualization tools (e.g., infographics, dynamic, illustrative, and interactive graphics), and present patterns, trends, analytical insights from data or new concepts in a strategic manner for the intended audience. In turn, they communicate the limitations of data by telling when data is being manipulated to support a limited or false narrative. With understanding of AI, they develop, select, and apply relevant algorithms and advanced computational methods to enable systems or software agents to learn, improve, adapt, and produce desired outcomes or tasks. They use it as a tool to enhance efficiency in creative processes, and develop strategies on how they utilise it in optimizing their own work performance (e.g., predictive behavior analytics, pattern recognition, and decision-making processes). They understand how data and AI may affect one’s perception and reasoning. Individuals are also able to leverage AI to augment their own intelligence while remaining aware of how human value judgements play into the applications of big data and AI in society.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals are confident in pursuing innovative and analytical careers. They are also proactive in applying their knowledge of data and AI into evaluating whether broader systems are acting in ways aligned with community values that promote well-being.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

Participatory Rights Management

The ability to understand and exercise one’s powers and right to online participation (e.g., their rights to personal data protection, freedom of expression, or to be forgotten).

Knowledge

Individuals understand their rights as digital citizens and consumers (e.g.,right to personal data protection, right to freedom of expression, or to be forgotten), and why opportunities for online participation are unevenly distributed across social groups (e.g., due to differences in socioeconomic status, (dis)ability, physical location).

Skills

Individuals become equipped to develop cognitive and meta-cognitive skills for synthesizing existing legislation with their own practices to ensure that digital rights are upheld and respected online; they also develop complex system-level thinking for upholding individual and community rights to online participation as they monitor and improve systems and hold contradictory ideas and ideals in tension.

Attitudes / Values

Individuals exhibit proactive thinking, grounded in respect for democratic ideals, the rule of law, human rights. They take responsibility for managing technology to promote the public good of society and the environment.

DQ Map includes
the following leading digital competency frameworks:

How the DQ Framework is connected
to the OECD's Transformative Competencies

The OECD Education 2030 Framework has identified three categories of competencies that empower individuals to transform their societies and shape their futures. These three "Transformative Competencies" are (1) creating new value, (2) reconciling tensions and dilemmas, and (3) taking responsibility. These intra-connected competencies connect with other future-readiness competencies, which have been identified by other organizations. These include "trending skills" that the WEF predicted, in their Future of Jobs 2018 Report, to be important for the workforce by 2022. Such skills include the following: Analytical thinking and innovation, Active learning and learning strategies, Creativity, originality and initiative, Technology design and programming, Critical thinking and analysis, Complex problem-solving, Leadership and social influence, Emotional intelligence, Reasoning, problem-solving and ideation, and Systems analysis and evaluation. This section provides examples of how each of the 24 DQ competencies can help develop the "trending skills" identified in the WEF Future of Jobs 2018 Report and, in turn, how they can enhance the OECD's Transformative Competencies.

OECD's Transformative Competencies

Creating New Value

  • Analytical thinking and innovation
    As is clear from the Digital Literacy competencies outlined above, individuals who develop and practice the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values of Media and Information Literacy, Content Creation and Computational Literacy, and Data and Financial Literacy will be attentive to and critical of data, information, content, and technology production and actively craft new and innovative approaches.
  • Active learning and learning strategies
    Active learning is embedded in competencies identified as Digital Identity, including the ability to learn while recognizing oneself as a life-long learner. For example, as individuals come to be identified as “Digital Changemakers,” curiosity about emerging trends within technological environments will drive awareness of existing gaps in their digital competencies and motivate efforts toward self-improvement. Moreover, individuals who identify as Digital Co-Creators will be able to develop efficient learning strategies, display an awareness of common and relevant technologies, and decide on which might best serve their purposes and needs.
  • Creativity, originality, and initiative
    The concepts of creativity and originality have been tightly interwoven within conceptualizations of Digital Intelligence through its second level, Digital Creativity. This second level of DQ is guided by the principle of using digital technologies to resolve global challenges to achieve individual and societal well-being. Individuals who are fluent in these competencies, for example, consciously practice and develop originality of thought and a willingness to address larger community and societal challenges.
  • Technology design and programming
    As described in the Content Creation and Computational Literacy and Intellectual Property Rights Management sections, individuals become equipped with the skills to design, develop, and adapt knowledge, content, and technology, and with characteristics, such as active learning, through their willingness to engage with evolving and advancing digital technologies.

Reconciling Tensions & Dilemmas

  • Complex Problem Solving
    As “Digital Citizens”, individuals become better able to understand the nuances of key debates, such as issues around data privacy, surveillance, and fake news. By understanding how technology shapes and is shaped by a wide array of factors, individuals will develop complex problem solving skills, extending their thinking and integrating digital networks and tools to develop solutions to address socioeconomic issues.
  • Systems analysis and evaluation
    The capacity for systems analysis and evaluation has similarly been imbued in the third level of DQ, Digital Competitiveness. Guided by the principles of innovation for the improvement of humanity, individuals fluent in these eight areas will be able to apply their critical thinking skills to understand the complexity of systems, such as how technology can contribute to the levelling of inequality. In developing these macro-level perspectives, individuals can come to understand how complex systems and institutions work together in the creation and maintenance of our digital landscapes.
  • Emotional intelligence
    Digital Emotional Intelligence forms one of the eight areas of Digital Intelligence. For individuals familiar with the competencies of Digital Empathy, Self-Awareness and Management, and Relationship Management, the building and development of one’s socio-emotional capacities and ability to think reflexively undergirds all of their experiences.

Taking Responsibility

  • Critical thinking and analysis
    The development of one’s capacity for critical thinking is a core ability underlying “Digital Citizenship.” Equipped with skills in Media and Information Literacy that are crucial for an age of information cascades, individuals develop their critical and analytical thinking to articulate information and content needs while simultaneously being cognizant of the dangers of disinformation and misinformation. Developed and honed through the first level of digital intelligence as part of “digital citizenship,” this capacity to discern enables individuals to independently manage their safety and security needs online.
  • Leadership and social influence
    Captured in the very first competency—Digital Identity—digital citizens are co-creators of technology, entrepreneurs, and changemakers; they not only understand their own participation online, but they are also familiar with the inherently social and interconnected nature of the Internet. Expanded upon in the competencies identified under Digital Communication, this knowledge of the Internet empowers digital citizens with practical skills, such as understanding which methods are most effective for communication, and with socio-emotional and leadership skills developed through active collaboration to achieve specified goals.
  • Reasoning, problem solving and ideation
    As Digital Co-creators, individuals seamlessly but intentionally integrate digital technologies into their everyday lives. With this intention, they will be able to build higher-order thinking and reasoning skills that aid in their capacity to explore their identity both on- and offline, to understand their contributions in a wider perspective, and to connect with others.
  • Coordination and time management
    Active collaboration—identified and highlighted as Online Communication and Collaboration—not only enables individuals to develop key leadership skills but also skills in project coordination and management. Starting with screen time management, identified in the Balanced Use of Technology section, such productivity skills are enhanced by one’s identification as a Digital Changemaker, where the development of project management skills, such as time management and resource delegation, thoroughly aids in the conceptualization and follow-through of group-based projects.

How DQ Framework Contributes to
OECD's 11 Areas of Well-Being and U.N. SDG

The ultimate goal of the DQ Framework is to guide digital practices towards achieving individual and societal well-being across all aspects of one's life.

The OECD's Better Life Initiative identified the following 11 areas of well-being: income, wealth, jobs, earnings, housing, quality of life, including health, civic engagement, social connections, education, security, life satisfaction, and the environment. These 11 areas of well-being, in turn, contribute to achieving the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs).

The UN SDGs focus on 17 societal dimensions, including ending poverty and promoting prosperity, well-being, and protection of the planet.

With the goal of advancing the UN SDGs, we adopted the OECD's 11 indicators of well-being as a guide for pinpointing areas where interventions can be made to equip individuals with digital intelligence.

1No Poverty

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

2Zero Hunger

End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

3Good Health
& Well-Being

Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

4Quality Education

Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

5Gender Equality

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

6Clean water
& Sanitation

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

7Affordable &
Clean Energy

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

8Decent Work &
Economic Growth

Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

9Industry,
Innovation &
Infastructure

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

10Reduced
Inequalities

Reduce inequality within and among countries

11Sustainable
Cities &
Communities

Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

12Responbible
Consumption &
Production

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

13Climate Action

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*

14Life Below Water

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

15Life on Land

Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

16Peace, Justice
& Strong
Institutions

Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

17Partnership
for the Goals

Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

OECD Well-Being
Indicators
Digital Intelligence (DQ)Competencies U.N. Sustainable Development Goal
Income Ending poverty around the world through the use and application of technology with digital intelligence. Goal 1: No Poverty
Ending hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture through the use of technology with digital intelligence. Goal 2: Zero Hunger
Health Ensuring healthful living and promote well-being in one's use of technology with digital intelligence. Goal 3: Health and Well-Being
Achieving gender equality by empowering all women and girls to confidently and competently use technology and digital intelligence. Goal 5: Gender Equality
Education Ensuring inclusive and equitable quality digital intelligence education and promote life-long learning opportunities that adapt to an ever-evolving digital landscape. Goal 4: Quality Education
Housing Promoting technological innovations through digital intelligence to address and ensure the availability of sustainable water and sanitation management for all. Goal 6: Clean Water and Sanitation
Environment Using technology with digital intelligence to ensure access to affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy for all. Goal 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
Jobs Contributing to sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work by upskilling for all. Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
Building resilient digital infrastructure, promoting inclusive and sustainable industrialization and innovation by fostering ethical cyber security and safety skills among citizens through digital intelligence. Goal 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
Life Satisfaction Reducing inequality within and among countries by supporting initiatives that address digital divides in access, skills, and infrastructure, and by providing affirmative action for those already vulnerable communities. Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities
Civic Engagement Ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns by using technology with digital intelligence to bring about equitable, just, and sustainable global supply chains. Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
Environment Applying digital intelligence to make cities and human settlements safer, more inclusive, more resilient, and more sustainable through the use of clean and sustainable technology. Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
Guiding one's use of technology with digital intelligence to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. Goal 13: Climate Action
Using technology with digital intelligence to conserve and sustainably use oceans, seas, and marine resources for sustainable development. Goal 14: Life Below Water
Using technology with digital intelligence to protect, restore, and promote the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and biodiversity loss. Goal 15: Life on Land
Safety Promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, providing access to justice for all, and building effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions at all levels by empowering communities with digital intelligence to reduce and mitigate evolving cyber risks and threats. Goal 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions
Community Strengthening technology by implementing digital intelligence and revitalizing global partnerships for sustainable development. Goal 17: Partnership for the Goals

DQ Micro-Badges

 

How can individuals know which specific digital skills do they need to learn, and how will these digital skills be relevant to their future-readiness, well-being, and career development?

The DQ Micro-Badge (DQ MB) system is a list of the micro-certifications of the DQ Global Standards (IEEETM 3527.1). Each of the DQ24 competencies has multiple constituent facets, represented by micro-badges. The DQ MB helps users to discover which digital skills topics within the DQ Global Standards they will need to obtain through education/training programs, and understand how these programs will enhance specific job readiness skills and overall well-being.

The DQ MB also helps digital skill training providers. By aligning with DQ MB, the providers will also be able to identify areas of strength and/or areas for potential improvement of the program, make strategic decisions to further enhance the program, and enhance the visibility of the program as a best practice for specific MBs.

DQ MB for Digital Citizenship

 

DQ MB Description of DQ MB Related Top 3 Future-Readiness Skills
DQ1 Digital Citizen Identity
DQ1.1 Digital Presence You have a personal presence in the digital world – you have meaningful access to the Internet through appropriate devices and are actively involved in various digital activities. Technological Skills  
Organizational Skill
Initiative
DQ1.2 Digital Confidence You are confident in using digital technology and media by understanding how the digital world is structured as well as how to utilize technology to set and achieve your goals. Technological Skills

Problem Solving

Adaptability

DQ1.3 Online Persona You understand that you are not only a citizen of the physical world but also a digital citizen. You know how your online persona is built through your digital activities that can shape not only your digital identity but also how others perceive you. Leadership

Initiative

Communication

DQ1.4 Digital Integrity You understand how technology (e.g., social media influencers and ads) can affect your self-image and values. You have a healthy self-esteem as a digital citizen without unnecessary social comparisons or internalized objectifying ideals from social media. You build a healthy identity that is congruent with the self (beliefs and values) both online and offline with integrity. Resilience

Social and Emotional skills

Leadership

DQ1.5 Global Digital Citizenship You understand that you are a global citizen in the digital world that transcends physical boundaries. You have global awareness and netiquette while being socially and emotionally aware and being open to understanding different views with cultural sensitivity online. Leadership

Social and Emotional skills

Adaptability

DQ2 Balanced Use of Technology
DQ2.1 Health Check - Digital Use You have healthy digital habits, maintaining balanced screen-time for entertainment such as videos, social media, and/or gaming. Organizational Skills

Resilience

Initiative

DQ2.2 Health Check - Tech Addiction You do not show the symptoms of technology addiction (e.g., gaming disorder or social media disorder). Organizational Skills

Resilience

Initiative

DQ2.3 Digital Use Effects You understand and are careful about the harmful effects of unbalanced digital use (e.g., excessive screen time, multi-tasking, or technology addiction) on your mental and physical health, well-being, relationships, and work performance. Organizational Skills

Problem Solving

Initiative

DQ2.4 Digital Self-Regulation You show self-regulation in your digital use by recognizing and respecting the value of your time. You manage your attention and are able to use technology as tools to achieve goals (e.g., learning, work, and collaboration), rather than simply as a reward or escape to distract or soothe yourself. Resilience

Social and Emotional skills

Leadership

DQ2.5 Digital Time Management You are able to manage on-/off-line time with priorities on important tasks and positive relationships with others in real life. You have clear strategies to manage digital use as needed using various tools (e.g., screen time limiting apps, alarm-setting) and rules (e.g. device-free zones, family media rules) for your well-being. Organizational Skills

Adaptability

Initiative

DQ3 Behavioural Cyber-Risk Management
DQ3.1 Understanding Cyberbullying You are aware of various types of cyberbullying and other behavioral cyber risks (e.g., online trolls, cyber harassment, stalking) and how to identify them. You understand how these risks can be started and escalated in online communities and how they can harm people who are involved. Communication

Social and Emotional skills

Analytical Thinking

DQ3.2 Dealing with Cyberbullying You are able to respond to cyberbullying and other behavioral cyber-risk incidences with technical, cognitive, socio-emotional, and communicative skills. You can be socially and emotionally resilient in order to cope with negative online experiences without escalating the situation. Resilience

Communication

Social and Emotional skills

DQ3.3 Thinking About Cyberbullying You are not tolerant of cyber-bullying and other behavioral cyber-risks. You do not consider them enjoyable, funny, or justifiable in any circumstances either in individual circles or in online communities you belong to. Resilience

Communication

Social and Emotional skills

DQ3.4 Staying Out of Cyberbullying You are careful about resisting the urge to get involved with cyber-bullying or other types of behavioral cyber-risks (e.g., online trolls, cyber harassment, stalking, and others). You support those who experience cyberbullying without escalating a situation. Resilience

Communication

Leadership

DQ4 Personal Cyber Security Management
DQ4.1 Basic Personal Security You are aware of different types of cyber threats (e.g., hacking, scams, malware). You know of available strategies and tools to avoid them and to protect your personal devices and data. Technological Skills

Analytical Thinking

Adaptability

DQ4.2 Managing Passwords You are able to secure your digital accounts with strong passwords and employ various tactics to keep them confidential. Technological Skills

Analytical Thinking

Organizational Skills

DQ4.3 Dealing with Cyber-Threat You are skillful in identifying, avoiding, and dealing with different personal cyber-threats with various strategies, practices, and tools to secure your data and devices. Technological Skills

Problem Solving

Adaptability

DQ4.4 Health Check – Cyber Threats You exhibit effective digital behaviors and attitudes toward managing your own cyber security to protect you from being exposed to various personal cyber-threats. Technological Skills

Critical Thinking

Organizational Skills

DQ5 Digital Empathy
DQ5.1. Online Empathy You understand what empathy is and how your online interactions might affect others’ feelings online. You are aware of, and sensitive to others’ feelings and needs in online communications. Social Emotional Skills

Communication

Creativity

DQ5.2. Self - Awareness You are sensitive to and aware of your own emotions and are able to regulate them effectively in online interactions. Social Emotional Skills

Communication

Adaptability

DQ5.3. Perspective Taking You are capable of considering the different perspectives of others and exercising the Golden Rule – “do to others as you want to be treated” in online interactions. Social Emotional Skills

Communication

Critical Thinking

DQ5.4. Online Kindness You are supportive of others’ feelings, needs and concerns by being kind and empathetic online. You can wisely speak up for others with compassion and courage without escalating cyber-risks. Social Emotional Skills

Communication

Leadership

DQ6 Digital Footprint Management
DQ6.1 Basic Digital Footprints You understand what digital footprints are, and how they are created, shaped, and used. Communication

Problem Solving

Analytical Thinking

DQ6.2 Digital Footprints Impact You know your digital footprints can be permanent, tracked, collected, and go viral, even against your will. You understand that your digital footprints can affect your reputation in real life. Technological Skills

Problem Solving

Critical Thinking

DQ6.3 Controlling Digital Footprints You are aware that emotions may affect people’s online behaviours and usually stop and think before reacting to negative online information. You are aware of your own digital footprint management abilities and intend to further improve your skills to check, monitor, and combat negative personal digital footprints through various tactics. Communication

Social Emotional Skills

Critical Thinking

DQ6.4 Caring About Digital Reputation You think it is important to build positive digital footprints. You have been taking care of your digital footprint. You intend to control negative digital footprints and improve positive digital footprints so that you can build a good digital reputation. Communication

Technological Skills

Initiative

DQ6.5. Digital Footprint Impacts (Company) You understand that your online activities using your company’s IT infrastructure can be traceable and your digital footprints can shape and affect your company’s reputation. You do not conduct personal online activities or risky behaviour on company computers and networks. Technological Skills

Problem Solving

Critical Thinking

DQ6.6. Mitigating Social Media Crises (Company) You know what to share and what not to share in a professional context, while being able to identify online information that can affect your company’s reputation. When you encounter negative digital footprints for your company, you know and follow company policies to deal with them to effectively mitigate potential social media crises. Communication

Social Emotional Skills

Critical Thinking

DQ6.7. Positive Digital Reputation (Company) You care about your company’s digital footprints. You have actively managed your company’s digital footprints and intend to contribute even in a difficult situation. Your co-workers also support your company’s positive digital reputation. Communication

Technological Skills

Initiative

DQ7 Media and Information Literacy
DQ7.1 Tech Operational Skills You are fluent in operating electronic devices (e.g., computer, mobile) as well as their software and applications. You have basic skills to use the Internet to navigate, search, gather, organize, synthesize, and create digital information. Technological Skills

Adaptability

Creativity

DQ7.2 Digital Information Evaluation You are able to critically evaluate digital information (e.g., media content, news, video, etc.) by examining reliability and credibility to discern dis-/mis-information. You know how digital information is created on online platforms, how the use of digital information influences to construct knowledge and public opinion, and how digital information can be potentially misused. Critical Thinking

Analytical Thinking

Technological Skills

DQ7.3 Managing Risky Content and Contacts You are able to identify, evaluate, and manage risky content (e.g., violence, lewd, hatred, unwanted content) and risky contacts (e.g. online grooming, extremists, unwanted sexual contact) with various strategies and technical tools while understanding their negative impact on well-being, safety, and mental health. Critical Thinking

Problem Solving

Resilience

DQ7.4 Health Check – Risky Content and Contact You have not been actively involved in nor intend to be involved with risky content (e.g., violence, sexual, hatred, or unwanted content) and risky contacts (e.g., online grooming, extremists, unwanted sexual contact) online. Critical Thinking

Organizational Skills

Resilience

DQ8 Privacy Management
DQ8.1 Personal Information You understand what personal information is, how personal information and privacy need to be protected as your human right, and how your personal information is used, stored, processed, and shared online. Analytical Thinking

Organizational Skills

Technological Skills

DQ8.2 Privacy Protection You are capable of keeping your own and others’ personal information safe, and protecting privacy through various strategies, tools and technology (e.g., privacy settings, limiting risky social exposure, anonymity, etc). Technological Skills 

Initiative

Problem Solving

DQ8.3 Privacy Attitudes You care about your own and others’ privacy online. While having critical eyes on privacy options provided by technology platforms, you are willing to take steps to protect your own and others’ personal information. Critical Thinking

Leadership

Resilience

DQ8.4 Health Check - Privacy You are good at safeguarding your own and others’ personal information while limiting risky social exposure or violating others’ privacy online. Critical Thinking

Leadership

Problem Solving

DQ8.5 Confidential Information (Company) You understand the difference between your own personal information and company-related confidential information. While knowing and following company policies for dealing company’s confidential information, you appropriately manage them. Critical Thinking

Organizational Skills

Initiative

Future-Readiness

How Can Individuals Build Future-Readiness Skills?
DQ Micro-Badges are a practical way to build future-readiness skills step-by-step.

The following 12 skills are commonly identified as important future-readiness skills for individuals to obtain in order to achieve their life well-being as well as their career development based various reports and literatures developed by the international organizations (e.g. OECD, the World Economic Forum), the private sectors (e.g. Accenture, Mckinsey), and the civic sectors (e.g. Ashoka).

Even though we agree with these frameworks for future-readiness, it may still get clearer to individuals or trainers about HOW to build these skills.

The DQ MB System, taken together, will develop many of the building blocks underlying all of these skills. We start with the level of Digital Citizenship (DQ1-8). This table provides a guide to understanding how DQ MBs (Digital Citizenship) are related to Future-Readiness Skills.

12 Future-Readiness Skills

 

Future-Readiness Skills
Related Skills Defined by Landing Frameworks
DQ MBs
1. Analytical Thinking
Analytical thinking and innovation
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Analysis and evaluation skills
[Fusion Skills]

 

Systems analysis and evaluation
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Awareness of data sources and applications
[Tech Know-How – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Data interpretation
[Tech Know-How – Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Analysis and application of data
[Tech Know-How – Mature-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Logical reason
[Create and Solve – Mature-level Skill – Accenture]

 

3. Organizational Skills
Organizational skills (planning, time management, deadlines, prioritization, multi-tasking)
[Fusion Skills]

 

Independent working / autonomy
[Fusion Skills]

 

Coordination & Time Management
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Focused attention
[Learn to Earn – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Organization
[Learn to Earn – Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Prioritization
[Learn to Earn – Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Sequencing
[Learn to Earn – Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Planning and execution
[Create and Solve – Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Management of direct reports and supervisors
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill2- Accenture]

 

Business conduct and protocol
[Learn to Earn- Mature level Skill, Accenture]

 

Job searching (e.g., resume writing and interviewing skills)
[Learn to Earn- Mature level Skill, Accenture]

 

4. Technological Skills
Technology use, monitoring, and control
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Technology design, and programming
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Awareness of and ability to use professional tools and programs
[Tech Know-How – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Understanding of professional tools and programs’ functionality
[Tech Know-How- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Coding
[Tech Know-How- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Content creation
[Tech Know-How- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Data interpretation
[Tech Know-How- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Graphics and visual design
[Tech Know-How- Medium level Skill, Accenture]

 

Software design
[Tech Know-How –- Medium level Skill, Accenture]

 

5. Problem Solving
Problem solving
[Fusion Skills]
[Create and Solve- Mature level Skill – Accenture]

 

Complex problem-solving
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Reasoning, problem-solving, and ideation
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Design thinking
[Create and Solve- Fundamental-level Skill – Accenture]

 

6. Creativity
Creativity
[Fusion Skills]
[Create and Solve – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Creativity, originality, and initiative
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Curiosity
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Imagination
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Creating New Value
[OECD Education 2030 Framework, Transformative Competency]

 

7. Initiative
Initiative
[Fusion Skills]

 

Creativity, originality, and initiative
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Self-Efficacy
[Learn to Earn – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Entrepreneurial mindset
[Create and Solve- Mature level Skill – Accenture]

 

Zest
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

8. Communication
Oral Communication/ presentation skills
[Fusion Skills]

 

Written communication
[Fusion Skills]

 

Communication
[We’Q-– Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Collaboration and Teamwork
[Fusion Skills]
[We’Q-– Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Listening
[We’Q-– Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Self-Control
[We’Q-– Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Active Listening
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Story telling
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

9. Adaptability
Adaptability / flexibility
[Fusion Skills]

 

Active learning and learning strategies
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Adaptability and continuous learning
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – Medium level Skill, Accenture]

 

Agility
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Flexibility
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Motivation to learn
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Openness
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Optimism
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Receptiveness to change
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Ability to give and receive feedback
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset – M2, Accenture]

 

Growth mindset
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset- Mature level Skill, Accenture]

 

10. Resilience
Resilience
[Fusion Skills]
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset- Mature level Skill, Accenture]

 

Resilience, stress tolerance and flexibility
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Grit and perseverance
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset- Medium-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Reconciling tensions and dilemmas
[OECD Education 2030 Framework, Transformative Competency]

 

11. Social and Emotional skills
Emotional Intelligence
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Emotional Self-Regulation
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill- Accenture]

 

Empathy
[Create and Solve-– Fundamental-level Skill, Accenture]

 

Mindfulness
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill- Accenture]

 

Self-awareness
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill- Accenture]

 

Service orientation
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Service mindset
[We’Q- Mature level Skill – Accenture]

 

Social intelligence
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill- Accenture]

 

Global mindset
[Cultivate a Growth Mindset- Mature level Skill, Accenture]

 

12. Leadership
Leadership and social influence
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill- Accenture]

 

Persuasion and negotiation
[WEF Top 15 Skills for 2025]

 

Decision making
[Create and Solve – Medium-level Skill – Accenture]

 

Judgement
[Create and Solve – Medium-level Skill – Accenture]

 

Negotiation
[We’Q- Medium-level Skill- Accenture]

 

Delegation
[We’Q- Mature level Skill- Accenture]

 

Taking responsibility
[OECD Education 2030 Framework, Transformative Competency]

 

 

Source:

World Economic Forum, The Future of Jobs Report 2020
https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-future-of-jobs-report-2020

Accenture, New Skills Now – Inclusion in the Digital Economy
https://www.accenture.com/_acnmedia/pdf-63/accenture-new-skills-now-inclusion-in-the-digital.pdf

McKinsey Global Institute, Skill Shift Automation and the Future of the Workforce
https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/industries/public%20and%20social%20sector/our%20insights/skill%20shift%20automation%20and%20the%20future%20of%20the%20workforce/mgi-skill-shift-automation-and-future-of-the-workforce- Medium-level Skillay-2018.pdf

The City of London, Fusion Skills
https://haberdashers.co.uk/sites/default/files/3.%20Anne%20Bamford%20-%20Livery%20Schools%20Conference_150319.pdf
https://www.screenskills.com/media/1551/fusion_report.pdf

OECD Education 2030 Framework
https://www.oecd.org/education/2030-project/
https://www.oecd.org/education/2030/E2030%20Position%20Paper%20(05.04.2018).pdf

Well-Being and SDGs

How DQ Framework Contributes to
OECD's 11 Areas of Well-Being and U.N. SDG

The ultimate goal of the DQ Framework is to guide digital practices towards achieving individual and societal well-being across all aspects of one's life.

The OECD's Better Life Initiative identified the following 11 areas of well-being: income, wealth, jobs, earnings, housing, quality of life, including health, civic engagement, social connections, education, security, life satisfaction, and the environment. These 11 areas of well-being, in turn, contribute to achieving the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs).

The UN SDGs focus on 17 societal dimensions, including ending poverty and promoting prosperity, well-being, and protection of the planet.

With the goal of advancing the UN SDGs, we adopted the OECD's 11 indicators of well-being as a guide for pinpointing areas where interventions can be made to equip individuals with digital intelligence.

1No Poverty

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

2Zero Hunger

End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

3Good Health
& Well-Being

Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

4Quality Education

Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

5Gender Equality

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

6Clean water
& Sanitation

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

7Affordable &
Clean Energy

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

8Decent Work &
Economic Growth

Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

9Industry,
Innovation &
Infastructure

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

10Reduced
Inequalities

Reduce inequality within and among countries

11Sustainable
Cities &
Communities

Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

12Responbible
Consumption &
Production

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

13Climate Action

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*

14Life Below Water

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

15Life on Land

Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

16Peace, Justice
& Strong
Institutions

Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

17Partnership
for the Goals

Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

OECD Well-Being
Indicators
Digital Intelligence (DQ)Competencies U.N. Sustainable Development Goal
Income Ending poverty around the world through the use and application of technology with digital intelligence. Goal 1: No Poverty
Ending hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture through the use of technology with digital intelligence. Goal 2: Zero Hunger
Health Ensuring healthful living and promote well-being in one's use of technology with digital intelligence. Goal 3: Health and Well-Being
Achieving gender equality by empowering all women and girls to confidently and competently use technology and digital intelligence. Goal 5: Gender Equality
Education Ensuring inclusive and equitable quality digital intelligence education and promote life-long learning opportunities that adapt to an ever-evolving digital landscape. Goal 4: Quality Education
Housing Promoting technological innovations through digital intelligence to address and ensure the availability of sustainable water and sanitation management for all. Goal 6: Clean Water and Sanitation
Environment Using technology with digital intelligence to ensure access to affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy for all. Goal 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
Jobs Contributing to sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work by upskilling for all. Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
Building resilient digital infrastructure, promoting inclusive and sustainable industrialization and innovation by fostering ethical cyber security and safety skills among citizens through digital intelligence. Goal 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
Life Satisfaction Reducing inequality within and among countries by supporting initiatives that address digital divides in access, skills, and infrastructure, and by providing affirmative action for those already vulnerable communities. Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities
Civic Engagement Ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns by using technology with digital intelligence to bring about equitable, just, and sustainable global supply chains. Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
Environment Applying digital intelligence to make cities and human settlements safer, more inclusive, more resilient, and more sustainable through the use of clean and sustainable technology. Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
Guiding one's use of technology with digital intelligence to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. Goal 13: Climate Action
Using technology with digital intelligence to conserve and sustainably use oceans, seas, and marine resources for sustainable development. Goal 14: Life Below Water
Using technology with digital intelligence to protect, restore, and promote the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and biodiversity loss. Goal 15: Life on Land
Safety Promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, providing access to justice for all, and building effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions at all levels by empowering communities with digital intelligence to reduce and mitigate evolving cyber risks and threats. Goal 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions
Community Strengthening technology by implementing digital intelligence and revitalizing global partnerships for sustainable development. Goal 17: Partnership for the Goals

Digital Parenting



Parents, Let's set the Standards.

 

We know parenting in this digital age is difficult. It’s easy for parents to feel intimidated or “out of the loop” when it comes to technology and digital media but relax, you don’t have to be a technology expert. There are three digital parenting principles you can take to set the standards for our children's online safety and digital citizenship:

  • PM1: Family Media Boundary – Parents have clear family tech rules and principles to provide children proper protection and guidance.
  • PM2: Parental Engagement - Parents engage in open and supportive active mediation to minimize negative effects and maximize positive effects of media use. Parents can nurture family values in children through technology, support children's social and emotional growth, and empower them to make the right choices online.
  • PM3: Family Network – Parents set a healthy digital environment for children - from connectivity, support network to seeking help as needed based on knowledge on tech trends and their impact on children.
Please remember that digital parenting is not about parents having control over their teens’ technology use, rather it is about parents empowering their teens to be good digital citizens who can minimize risks and maximize potentials in the digital world.

Let’s make our families digitally ready. We can improve the standards in our children’s digital lives and help them use technology wisely.

 

 

 

 


Digital Parenting
Digital Parenting MB
MB Description
DQ Digital Citizenship that Children Will Obtain through Digital Parenting
PM1
 
Family Media Boundary
PM1.1
 
Family Tech Agreement
Parents set clear family rules and principles on technology and media that parents and children can abide by together. Parents model appropriate media use, which not only includes media rules for children, but also media rules for parents, such as not using devices at meals, having media in common rooms, and not having personal media in bedrooms. Healthy family habits maintain a variety of activities, keeping media use in moderation. These include having meals together, playing games, reading, etc.
 
PM1.2
 
Limit-Setting
Parents set appropriate limits for children’s media use. This includes setting limits on the amount of time and when media may be used, limits on types or content of media, and technological approaches (e.g., parental control apps, filtering, or other monitoring software) to establishing boundaries for children’s media use for your children’s overall health and well-being.
 
PM1.3
 
Mutual Approval
Parents set clear family rules and principles on media content and contact that parents and children can abide by together, such as not to share private images of their children in social media without children’s consent, not downloading anything without parental approval, etc.
 
PM1.4
 
Tech Readiness
Parents set clear policies on children's ownership and active use of digital devices and media (e.g. when children can get their own mobile and how to use it, when children can have social media accounts). They have to be aligned with laws in their own countries.
PM2
 
Parental Engagement
PM2.1
 
Socioemotional Growth
Parents avoid using media as a babysitter, nor do they routinely use them to calm children down. Instead, parents help children experience and work with their emotions without necessarily trying to get away or distract themselves from them. In this way, parents model appropriate media use and how children can take responsibility for their emotional states and find more positive ways of coping than distraction.
 
PM2.2
 
Cyber-Safety Conversation

Parents engage in open and supportive active mediation. It involves proactively talking with children about their favourite apps, games, or websites and discussing various aspects of cyber-risks (such as privacy invasion, cyber-bullying, gaming addiction, etc).

Parents share media activities with their children as part of family life. They engage together by viewing the same TV shows or movies, playing the same games, or browsing the Internet to build trust and share media experiences. Parents keep lines of communication open while asking about children’s online experiences, whether they are having any issues.

Parents reassure their children that you are doing everything possible to stay safe and they can always come to you, no matter what.

 
PM2.3
 
Advanced Active Mediation

Active mediation goes beyond simply stating opinions about media, but uses questions to get children to consider why things are depicted how they are, whose point of view is shown/not shown, what the motivations of the writers may be, what the effects of viewing these types of portrayals may be, etc. This helps children learn to evaluate media messages more critically.

If parents co-view/co-play with children, they also use this time as a way to have these discussions. This allows parents to discuss and share their family’s values by using media content as a natural springboard for discussion.

Parents actively ask children’s opinion and help children think about the subliminal message, hidden agenda of media content, and its creation process.

Parents can discuss difficult issues such as relationships, sex, aggression, etc. to help children learn how to seek situations that will make them happy and healthy.

PM 3
 
Family Network
PM3.1
 
Family Tech Use

Parents provide good digital access to children with an understanding of their own and their children's digital use habits at home (e.g. how many devices, what device their children connect on which network).

 
PM3.2
 
Technology Impact

Parents understand the trends and research about benefits of technology as well as potential risks of technology.

They understand how technology affects children’s well-being and development such as brain development, school grades, and mental health.

 
PM3.3
 
Support Network

Parents develop a good support and protection network around their children. It begins with having consistent digital parenting policies among all caregivers within their house (e.g., partner, grandparents, babysitter, etc).

Parents proactively work with school teachers related to their online schooling and cyber-protection.

Parents know when and how to seek external helps including a school counsellor, psychologist, police, or other professional experts as necessary.